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China sets up $1.65 bn fund to fight air pollution
February 13, 2014, 4:06 am

Some Chinese experts are suggesting that China could grant its environment ministry veto powers over high-polluting projects [AP]

Some Chinese experts are suggesting that China could grant its environment ministry veto powers over high-polluting projects [AP]

China is forging ahead with new anti-pollution measures to save its citizens from the choking smog with the government announcing a $1.65 billion fund to fight air pollution on Wednesday.

A State Council (the Chinese Cabinet) meet chaired by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang decided that “political achievements” of local governments will now be ranked after inputs on the total emissions of their province. China has been prone to severe air pollution levels.

Li also announced rewards for companies that “clean up their operations”.

The central government said it will monitor the total emissions of each province. The air quality in Chinese cities is often poor with readings for PM 2.5 pollution sometimes 26 times as high as the 25 micrograms considered safe by the World Health Organization.

Officials at the meet vowed to advance energy efficiency, including improving gasoline standards for cars, and eliminate outdated equipment and factories. China will also continue to subsidize new energy model electric cars.

The government said it intends to upgrade grids, and boost the supply of diesel oil and the construction of energy saving buildings.

As China prepared to catch-up with the developed world and overtake the US as the world’s largest economy, environment protection suffered a severe setback, poisoning most of the country’s air, water and soil.

Some Chinese experts are suggesting that China could grant its environment ministry veto powers over high-polluting projects.

Meanwhile, dangerous levels of air pollution in New Delhi has beaten the smog-filled skies of Beijing, show new environmental indicators according to a new study by New Delhi-based Centre for Science and Environment (CSE).

The report says while PM10 levels in Beijing have decreased by about 40 per cent from 2000 to 2013, in New Delhi it has increased by about 47 per cent from 2000 to 2011. PM10 levels in Delhi are nearly double that of Beijing.

 

TBP and Agencies

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