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China’s anti-corruption campaign to be strengthened: Li
March 29, 2016, 2:26 am

The Chinese Premier said there will be no relaxation of China's three-year compaign to stamp out graft [Xinhua]

The Chinese Premier said there will be no relaxation of China’s three-year campaign to stamp out graft [Xinhua]

There will be no relaxation of China’s three-year campaign to stamp out graft and the government plans more measures to stamp out corruption including greater supervision of public finances, Premier Li Keqiang said during a special cabinet meeting on Monday, according to state media.

Chinese President Xi Jinping has said he is determined to make China this year a place where “nobody dares to be corrupt.”

The anti-graft effort in 2016 will expand efforts to hunt down so-called “economic fugitives” who have fled overseas, Chinese media quoted Xi at a meeting of the ruling party’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection.

On Monday Premier Li said that the government had made much progress in anti-corruption work last year, but there were still areas that needed more attention.

Supervision of both the use of national funds and of state-owned enterprises needed to be strengthened, he said. There should be strict investigation of any misappropriation of government funds and further efforts to ensure that the use of public money benefits the people and is used properly.

The government also needs to streamline procedures and eliminate excessive red tape, including for companies seeking administrative approval for investments, Li said.

Supervisory mechanisms should also be strengthened to ensure that major policies, such as reform measures and engineering projects, are implemented.

The government would closely monitor land use rights, mining rights and the bidding for engineering projects, he said.

President Xi warned soon after taking power in late 2012 that corruption threatened the legitimacy of the ruling Communist Party and pledged a relentless effort to stamp out graft at all level of Chinese society.

Source: Agencies

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