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Canada spying on Brazil mining ministry- Globo
October 7, 2013, 9:01 am

A spokesperson for Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper refused to either confirm or deny the allegations, said Associated Press [Getty Images]

A spokesperson for Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper refused to either confirm or deny the allegations, said Associated Press [Getty Images]

A new report by Brazil’s Globo media says Canada has been spying on the Latin American country’s mining ministry.

During a programme telecast on Sunday, Globo TV cited documents obtained by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

In what could spell a fallout between Brazil and Canada, the report says Communications Security Establishment Canada, or CSEC, were intercepting metadata of phone calls and emails of the Brazilian ministry.

Brazilian Mines and Energy Minister Edison Lobao told Globo that “Canada has interests in Brazil, above all in the mining sector. I can’t say if the spying served corporate interests or other groups.”

The report suggest that data of phone calls, emails and other communications of the Mining and Energy Brazilian Ministry were intercepted by Canadian intelligence agencies.

A spokesperson for Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper refused to either confirm or deny the allegations, said Associated Press.

Earlier last month, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff postponed her first official visit to the US during the Obama administration’s second term saying she has not received adequate answers about alleged National Security Agency spying in her country.

Stung by reports of large-scale US intelligence snooping on Brazilians and state firms, Rousseff attacked the United States in her opening speech at the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA).

“Brazil, Mr President, knows how to protect itself. We reject, fight and do not harbour terrorist groups,” said President Rousseff.

The Brazilian president announced to world leaders gathered in New York that the country will usher in new legislation and technology to shield its citizens from such surveillance.

She also urged the UN to form a global body that would draft international rules on privacy and security in cyberspace.

“The time is ripe to create the conditions to prevent cyberspace from being used as a weapon of war, through espionage, sabotage and attacks against systems and infrastructure of other countries,” she said.

Source: Agencies

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